Alstom helping smart city become smarter

“Alstom is a strong leader in IT and automation technologies for energy and transportation infrastructure and thus well-positioned in that space [smart city],” remarks Laurent Schmitt, Vice President, Smart Grid Solutions, Alstom
 Alstom is very active in global and local smart city projects. The organisation has built up a strong expertise and technological know-how through many eco-city demonstration projects. In a conversation with EPR, Laurent Schmitt shares how Alstom successfully brings the knowledge and capacity to integrate all kinds of power generation.
Alstom in developing smart citiesA smart city is a concept of transversal optimisation to deliver energy, water, transportation, public health and safety, and other key services to empower cities to run better and control critical infrastructure operations while providing a clean, economic and safe environment to the people. For Alstom, it’s more than just a proof-of-concept. Alstom is very active in global and local smart city projects, building up a strong expertise and technological know-how through many eco-city demonstration projects that are under implementation worldwide such as Philadelphia, Las Vegas in the US, Dublin or Rotterdam in Europe. Alstom grid innovation is helping bridge the gap between existing technology and the rapidly evolving digital era with new information and telecommunication technologies. Alstom also brings the knowledge and capacity to integrate all kinds of power generation — renewable, thermal and storage — which translates into significant environmental, social, technological and economic savings for the cities.
Helping smart city become smarterAlstom is a strong leader in IT and automation technologies for energy and transportation infrastructure and thus well-positioned in that space. It has already designed a reference smart city architecture, which can be used as a backbone for rapid smart city deployment. Alstom has the expertise in key smart grid technologies to reach the end consumer or the smart city, through partnerships. This strategy positions Alstom across the entire energy value chain from power generation to end consumer. Its different solutions are:

Real-time two-way information technology system
Energy storage capacity at city level, with integrated dynamic forecasting and communication technologies to store or incorporate renewable energy into the grid and help balance overall demand to production
Intermittent renewable energy integration on the city electrical grid: wind, solar, thermal
Distributed generation integration: connecting multiple renewable energy power plants and integrating islanding solutions (becoming autonomous)
Enabling use of plug-in electric vehicles therefore providing additional storage services.
Supporting smart city projectsAlstom has the ability to improve urban energy management at the distribution level with ICT (information and communication technologies) and its leading software to optimise the use of electrical infrastructures and energy:

Smart distribution grid — production, consumption and storage
Equipment and resources optimising energy efficiency, electricity consumption monitoring and cost savings
Common software architecture and open data monitoring and analysis platform
Multi-criteria visualisation (weather forecasts, end-user consumption, local clean energy generation)
Mission ‘100 smart cities’In order to achieve 100 smart cities by 2020, the infrastructure including power, transportation, and water supply of these cities should be created in such a manner that it supports the population growth for the next five to six decades rather than addressing the immediate requirement. Further, the model should be flexible and allow for capacity addition in a quick time and without too much construction and associated hindrances. All the appliances should be energy efficient to ensure minimal power usage while facilities should be created to recycle water to the extent possible. Every single unit — whether its water or power — should be accounted for to curb transmission and distribution losses and pilferage. The road map should also ensure that all the stakeholders involved in generation and distribution of essential services should get the right price to put an end to the subsidy culture.

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Alstom helping smart city become smarter

“Alstom is a strong leader in IT and automation technologies for energy and transportation infrastructure and thus well-positioned in that space [smart city],” remarks Laurent Schmitt, Vice President, Smart Grid Solutions, Alstom
 Alstom is very active in global and local smart city projects. The organisation has built up a strong expertise and technological know-how through many eco-city demonstration projects. In a conversation with EPR, Laurent Schmitt shares how Alstom successfully brings the knowledge and capacity to integrate all kinds of power generation.
Alstom in developing smart citiesA smart city is a concept of transversal optimisation to deliver energy, water, transportation, public health and safety, and other key services to empower cities to run better and control critical infrastructure operations while providing a clean, economic and safe environment to the people. For Alstom, it’s more than just a proof-of-concept. Alstom is very active in global and local smart city projects, building up a strong expertise and technological know-how through many eco-city demonstration projects that are under implementation worldwide such as Philadelphia, Las Vegas in the US, Dublin or Rotterdam in Europe. Alstom grid innovation is helping bridge the gap between existing technology and the rapidly evolving digital era with new information and telecommunication technologies. Alstom also brings the knowledge and capacity to integrate all kinds of power generation — renewable, thermal and storage — which translates into significant environmental, social, technological and economic savings for the cities.
Helping smart city become smarterAlstom is a strong leader in IT and automation technologies for energy and transportation infrastructure and thus well-positioned in that space. It has already designed a reference smart city architecture, which can be used as a backbone for rapid smart city deployment. Alstom has the expertise in key smart grid technologies to reach the end consumer or the smart city, through partnerships. This strategy positions Alstom across the entire energy value chain from power generation to end consumer. Its different solutions are:

Real-time two-way information technology system
Energy storage capacity at city level, with integrated dynamic forecasting and communication technologies to store or incorporate renewable energy into the grid and help balance overall demand to production
Intermittent renewable energy integration on the city electrical grid: wind, solar, thermal
Distributed generation integration: connecting multiple renewable energy power plants and integrating islanding solutions (becoming autonomous)
Enabling use of plug-in electric vehicles therefore providing additional storage services.
Supporting smart city projectsAlstom has the ability to improve urban energy management at the distribution level with ICT (information and communication technologies) and its leading software to optimise the use of electrical infrastructures and energy:

Smart distribution grid — production, consumption and storage
Equipment and resources optimising energy efficiency, electricity consumption monitoring and cost savings
Common software architecture and open data monitoring and analysis platform
Multi-criteria visualisation (weather forecasts, end-user consumption, local clean energy generation)
Mission ‘100 smart cities’In order to achieve 100 smart cities by 2020, the infrastructure including power, transportation, and water supply of these cities should be created in such a manner that it supports the population growth for the next five to six decades rather than addressing the immediate requirement. Further, the model should be flexible and allow for capacity addition in a quick time and without too much construction and associated hindrances. All the appliances should be energy efficient to ensure minimal power usage while facilities should be created to recycle water to the extent possible. Every single unit — whether its water or power — should be accounted for to curb transmission and distribution losses and pilferage. The road map should also ensure that all the stakeholders involved in generation and distribution of essential services should get the right price to put an end to the subsidy culture.

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