Indian Navy plans ocean thermal energy conversion plant in Andaman

India is well positioned for the development of OTEC with a temperature difference above 20 degrees throughout the year along the South Indian coast and islands like Andaman and Nicobar.
– Laurent Albert, Vice President – Business Development Asia-Pacific, DCNS Ocean Energy Business Line
Indian Navy plans to go green by setting up ocean thermal energy plant at Andaman & Nicobar Islands. It has recently conducted preliminary feasibility studies for OTEC plant, with the French collaborator, DCNS. In an interview with Subhajit Roy, Laurent Albert explains the potential of renewable marine energy in India.  Could you talk about the recent trends in the field of renewable marine energy (MRE)?Never has the need for alternative energies been as urgent and topical as it is today. While the International Energy Agency estimates the increase in demand by 2030 to be 30 per cent, fossil resources (oil, gas, coal) are running out when at the same time climate change requires that we reduce our CO2 emissions.
The necessity of developing new sources of clean, renewable energy has become a global preoccupation and represents one of the solutions identified to meet the objectives defined in the Paris agreement on the reduction of climate change, signed at the end of COP21 last December.
In this context, with over 70 per cent of the planet being covered with oceans and 2/3 of the world population living less than 200 km from the sea, marine renewable energies represent a substantial potential, through the exploitation of the power generated by waves, tides, offshore wind or ocean thermal energy conversion. Aware of this potential and capitalising on its historical expertise in naval defence, DCNS decided in 2008 to develop in marine renewable energy. Indeed, while examining this new sector we discovered that there were significant synergies with the area of naval defence especially regarding the key technologies and industrial practices being used.
Today, DCNS is working on three technologies of marine renewable energy: tidal energy, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), and offshore wind energy.
Our knowledge of complex systems and maritime technologies, as well as our industrial infrastructures, allow us to play a driving role for the entire realisation cycle of these new technologies, from their design to their construction or execution and maintenance.
How the global market for renewable marine energy is evolving?With rapidly growing power demand and concerns over energy security and local pollution, deployment of renewables has been accelerating and is expected to continue to do so. In this context, the development of marine renewable energy has the potential to provide clean, sustainable energy, contributing to a diversified energy mix and industrial growth with economic and environmental benefits.
Yet today most types of MRE technologies are still at demonstration stage or the initial stage of industrialisation. Over the last years, some prototypes in tidal and offshore wind energy have been tested in real conditions and now the global focus is on accelerating development by moving to the next phase with the planning and testing of pilot arrays, a very important phase that will help to validate the economic viability of these technologies. Commercialisation phase for these technologies is starting.
Tidal energy is the most mature of the different MRE technologies and in this sector DCNS along with its subsidiary Open Hydro are forging ahead, both from a technological and industrial point of view. The Group has already tested 7 generations of its tidal turbine and will make an industry first in 2016 with the installation of the first pilot arrays in the world, in France (Brittany) and in Canada (Bay of Fundy).
OTEC is a non-intermittent base-load energy source that could represent medium-term green alternative to so-called “fossil” fuels (gas, diesel, coal), which are still used massively on isolated tropical sites (islands) that have no connection to continental electrical networks.
DCNS is well positioned to do so thanks to its land-based OTEC prototype in Indian Ocean island of La Réunion where the Group is conducting tests to continuously improve the efficiency of the power-production system and optimise the technology’s costs. Besides in 2014 the Group, along with its partner Akuo Energy, was selected by European NER 300 Program, to develop a demonstration offshore OTEC plant in Martinique Island that will be operational by 2020.
At commercial stage, MRE projects will create jobs locally with the manufacturing and installation of industrial hubs next to the resource to ensure the assembly and maintenance of MRE technologies.
How do you see the potential of renewable marine energy in India?  Where does India stand in terms of realising this potential? India is well positioned for the development of OTEC with a temperature difference above 20 degrees throughout the year along the South Indian coast and islands like Andaman and Nicobar. The islands in particular also have the depth of 1,200 metres in closer vicinity to coast line – making the offshore OTEC plant a serious possibility.
Tidal turbines convert the energy contained in sea currents, just like wind turbines do with the energy contained in the wind. They use the force and speed of the sea currents to drive their rotation. These currents, which are a result of the tides, have the characteristic of being predictable and are particularly powerful on certain sites.
With its long coastline, the state of Gujarat has a great potential for tidal energy, with strong currents in particular in the Gulf of Cambay and in the Gulf of Kutch.
Besides the natural characteristics of the country, the development of marine renewable energy projects in India is triggered by the economic growth, which resulted in the increase of the electricity demand. Self-sufficiency in energy for islands will also add strength to Indian Navy’s strong presence in the Indian Oceans.
Last but not least, the Government of India is really committed to developing programs to accelerate and enhance support for the manufacturing, design, research, development, resource assessment, testing and deployment of marine renewable energies in the country.
What are DCNS’s efforts in establishing renewable marine energy market in India? Could you throw some light on your proposed plan of setting up OTEC plant in Andaman & Nicobar Island? DCNS already has a strong industrial commitment in India through the localisation programme on P75 for the construction of six Scorpene submarines. We see our relationship with India as both a strategic and industrial partnership and this is the reason why we created a local subsidiary, DCNS India in 2009.
Today, DCNS is willing to enhance its collaboration with the Indian Navy and local shipbuilding industry, in both the naval defence and the marine renewable energy sectors.
The Group has performed and presented a pre-feasibility study to the Indian Navy for deploying an offshore OTEC plant at Andaman Island.
We are convinced that OTEC could be a solution to replace diesel-based sources currently used in the island. OTEC offers base load, non-intermittent and carbon-free energy, without any uncertainty regarding the resource and the Andaman Island meets all the criteria to develop such a project: a temperature difference of more than 20 degrees between the warm water in surface and the cold water in the depths; a willingness and strong commitment of the Navy to achieve energy self-sufficiency.
The OTEC technology developed by DCNS, currently being improved in Reunion Island and later installed in real conditions in Martinique, could benefit all overseas island territories non-connected to continental power grid like Indian islands.
DCNS is committed to bringing its expertise in marine renewable energy to work in partnership with the Indian industry to develop and “Make in India” future projects in OTEC and/or tidal energy.

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Indian Navy plans ocean thermal energy conversion plant in Andaman

India is well positioned for the development of OTEC with a temperature difference above 20 degrees throughout the year along the South Indian coast and islands like Andaman and Nicobar.
– Laurent Albert, Vice President – Business Development Asia-Pacific, DCNS Ocean Energy Business Line
Indian Navy plans to go green by setting up ocean thermal energy plant at Andaman & Nicobar Islands. It has recently conducted preliminary feasibility studies for OTEC plant, with the French collaborator, DCNS. In an interview with Subhajit Roy, Laurent Albert explains the potential of renewable marine energy in India.  Could you talk about the recent trends in the field of renewable marine energy (MRE)?Never has the need for alternative energies been as urgent and topical as it is today. While the International Energy Agency estimates the increase in demand by 2030 to be 30 per cent, fossil resources (oil, gas, coal) are running out when at the same time climate change requires that we reduce our CO2 emissions.
The necessity of developing new sources of clean, renewable energy has become a global preoccupation and represents one of the solutions identified to meet the objectives defined in the Paris agreement on the reduction of climate change, signed at the end of COP21 last December.
In this context, with over 70 per cent of the planet being covered with oceans and 2/3 of the world population living less than 200 km from the sea, marine renewable energies represent a substantial potential, through the exploitation of the power generated by waves, tides, offshore wind or ocean thermal energy conversion. Aware of this potential and capitalising on its historical expertise in naval defence, DCNS decided in 2008 to develop in marine renewable energy. Indeed, while examining this new sector we discovered that there were significant synergies with the area of naval defence especially regarding the key technologies and industrial practices being used.
Today, DCNS is working on three technologies of marine renewable energy: tidal energy, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), and offshore wind energy.
Our knowledge of complex systems and maritime technologies, as well as our industrial infrastructures, allow us to play a driving role for the entire realisation cycle of these new technologies, from their design to their construction or execution and maintenance.
How the global market for renewable marine energy is evolving?With rapidly growing power demand and concerns over energy security and local pollution, deployment of renewables has been accelerating and is expected to continue to do so. In this context, the development of marine renewable energy has the potential to provide clean, sustainable energy, contributing to a diversified energy mix and industrial growth with economic and environmental benefits.
Yet today most types of MRE technologies are still at demonstration stage or the initial stage of industrialisation. Over the last years, some prototypes in tidal and offshore wind energy have been tested in real conditions and now the global focus is on accelerating development by moving to the next phase with the planning and testing of pilot arrays, a very important phase that will help to validate the economic viability of these technologies. Commercialisation phase for these technologies is starting.
Tidal energy is the most mature of the different MRE technologies and in this sector DCNS along with its subsidiary Open Hydro are forging ahead, both from a technological and industrial point of view. The Group has already tested 7 generations of its tidal turbine and will make an industry first in 2016 with the installation of the first pilot arrays in the world, in France (Brittany) and in Canada (Bay of Fundy).
OTEC is a non-intermittent base-load energy source that could represent medium-term green alternative to so-called “fossil” fuels (gas, diesel, coal), which are still used massively on isolated tropical sites (islands) that have no connection to continental electrical networks.
DCNS is well positioned to do so thanks to its land-based OTEC prototype in Indian Ocean island of La Réunion where the Group is conducting tests to continuously improve the efficiency of the power-production system and optimise the technology’s costs. Besides in 2014 the Group, along with its partner Akuo Energy, was selected by European NER 300 Program, to develop a demonstration offshore OTEC plant in Martinique Island that will be operational by 2020.
At commercial stage, MRE projects will create jobs locally with the manufacturing and installation of industrial hubs next to the resource to ensure the assembly and maintenance of MRE technologies.
How do you see the potential of renewable marine energy in India?  Where does India stand in terms of realising this potential? India is well positioned for the development of OTEC with a temperature difference above 20 degrees throughout the year along the South Indian coast and islands like Andaman and Nicobar. The islands in particular also have the depth of 1,200 metres in closer vicinity to coast line – making the offshore OTEC plant a serious possibility.
Tidal turbines convert the energy contained in sea currents, just like wind turbines do with the energy contained in the wind. They use the force and speed of the sea currents to drive their rotation. These currents, which are a result of the tides, have the characteristic of being predictable and are particularly powerful on certain sites.
With its long coastline, the state of Gujarat has a great potential for tidal energy, with strong currents in particular in the Gulf of Cambay and in the Gulf of Kutch.
Besides the natural characteristics of the country, the development of marine renewable energy projects in India is triggered by the economic growth, which resulted in the increase of the electricity demand. Self-sufficiency in energy for islands will also add strength to Indian Navy’s strong presence in the Indian Oceans.
Last but not least, the Government of India is really committed to developing programs to accelerate and enhance support for the manufacturing, design, research, development, resource assessment, testing and deployment of marine renewable energies in the country.
What are DCNS’s efforts in establishing renewable marine energy market in India? Could you throw some light on your proposed plan of setting up OTEC plant in Andaman & Nicobar Island? DCNS already has a strong industrial commitment in India through the localisation programme on P75 for the construction of six Scorpene submarines. We see our relationship with India as both a strategic and industrial partnership and this is the reason why we created a local subsidiary, DCNS India in 2009.
Today, DCNS is willing to enhance its collaboration with the Indian Navy and local shipbuilding industry, in both the naval defence and the marine renewable energy sectors.
The Group has performed and presented a pre-feasibility study to the Indian Navy for deploying an offshore OTEC plant at Andaman Island.
We are convinced that OTEC could be a solution to replace diesel-based sources currently used in the island. OTEC offers base load, non-intermittent and carbon-free energy, without any uncertainty regarding the resource and the Andaman Island meets all the criteria to develop such a project: a temperature difference of more than 20 degrees between the warm water in surface and the cold water in the depths; a willingness and strong commitment of the Navy to achieve energy self-sufficiency.
The OTEC technology developed by DCNS, currently being improved in Reunion Island and later installed in real conditions in Martinique, could benefit all overseas island territories non-connected to continental power grid like Indian islands.
DCNS is committed to bringing its expertise in marine renewable energy to work in partnership with the Indian industry to develop and “Make in India” future projects in OTEC and/or tidal energy.

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