Powering India

Kshitija Kolhapure outlines the performance and future growth plans of Coal India
 Coal India was formed in 1975, after coal mine were nationalised with effect from 1st May 1973. Today, it is the world’s largest coal producer, with seven wholly owned coal producing subsidiaries and 1 mine planning and consultancy company spread over 8 states of India. Not only this, it also owns ‘Coal India Africana Limitada’, which is a mining company in Mozambique. In addition, it also owns 26 technical and management training institutes and 102 vocational training institutes.   
Enhanced performanceAt its inception, Coal India started with a modest production of seventy-nine million tonnes. Now it produces over 400 million tonnes of coal annually. And dominates 74 per cent of the Indian coal market. In spite of facing challenges such as: land acquisition and greener clearance, Coal India in the  FY 2014-15, improved its performance by 7 per cent. Coal India has put up a commendable performance in FY ending 2015 producing 494.23 million tonnes of coal registering 7 per cent growth. The production increase in absolute terms has been nearly 32 million tonnes compared to the previous fiscal which is highest ever incremental increase in a single financial year since the inception of the company. Despatch of coal and coal products from Coal India as a whole to power utilities of the country during 2014-15 surged ahead to 384.18 million tonnes, up by 30.35 million tonnes, from that of 353.83 million tonnes achieved in 2013-14 registering 8.5 per cent growth. Coal India has set an ambitious target of producing 550 million tonnes of coal during 2015-16.
Meeting India’s needIn India, coal as an irreplaceable dominant energy fuel meets more than 50 per cent of primary commercial needs. Coal India alone meets around 40 per cent of the primary commercial requirements of the country. The gap between demand and supply is increasing annually. The country’s coal demand is racing ahead of the indigenous coal production. During 2014-15, while the country’s coal demand has been 787 million tonnes, the actual all India coal production was around 611 million tonnes (Provisional). For the year 2015-16, the country’s coal demand is projected at 910 million tonnes whereas the production is expected to be around 700 million tonnes.
In an aim to meet the ever increasing demand, Coal India is striving to increase its production capacity. The company has identified certain major issues, which would help enhance production. Seeing the timely completion of three major railway lines is priority short-term strategy, which would unlock large coal reserves in the states of Jharkhand, Chattisgarh and Odisha for evacuation. Another short-term measure is pursuing MDO (Mine Development Operators) process which would supplement coal production.
Technology nurturingTo increase the production and meet the supply demand, in future, Coal India’s strategies would include productivity improvement in mines through Technology upgradation in opencast mines with induction of high capacity equipment and in underground mines with continuous miner technology in large scale, long wall technology at selected mines, man riding system in major mines and use of telemonitoring techniques. Other system improvements include e-procurement of equipment and spares, e-tender of works and services etc.
Ultimately Coal India’s aim is to meet the targets diligently.

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Powering India

Kshitija Kolhapure outlines the performance and future growth plans of Coal India
 Coal India was formed in 1975, after coal mine were nationalised with effect from 1st May 1973. Today, it is the world’s largest coal producer, with seven wholly owned coal producing subsidiaries and 1 mine planning and consultancy company spread over 8 states of India. Not only this, it also owns ‘Coal India Africana Limitada’, which is a mining company in Mozambique. In addition, it also owns 26 technical and management training institutes and 102 vocational training institutes.   
Enhanced performanceAt its inception, Coal India started with a modest production of seventy-nine million tonnes. Now it produces over 400 million tonnes of coal annually. And dominates 74 per cent of the Indian coal market. In spite of facing challenges such as: land acquisition and greener clearance, Coal India in the  FY 2014-15, improved its performance by 7 per cent. Coal India has put up a commendable performance in FY ending 2015 producing 494.23 million tonnes of coal registering 7 per cent growth. The production increase in absolute terms has been nearly 32 million tonnes compared to the previous fiscal which is highest ever incremental increase in a single financial year since the inception of the company. Despatch of coal and coal products from Coal India as a whole to power utilities of the country during 2014-15 surged ahead to 384.18 million tonnes, up by 30.35 million tonnes, from that of 353.83 million tonnes achieved in 2013-14 registering 8.5 per cent growth. Coal India has set an ambitious target of producing 550 million tonnes of coal during 2015-16.
Meeting India’s needIn India, coal as an irreplaceable dominant energy fuel meets more than 50 per cent of primary commercial needs. Coal India alone meets around 40 per cent of the primary commercial requirements of the country. The gap between demand and supply is increasing annually. The country’s coal demand is racing ahead of the indigenous coal production. During 2014-15, while the country’s coal demand has been 787 million tonnes, the actual all India coal production was around 611 million tonnes (Provisional). For the year 2015-16, the country’s coal demand is projected at 910 million tonnes whereas the production is expected to be around 700 million tonnes.
In an aim to meet the ever increasing demand, Coal India is striving to increase its production capacity. The company has identified certain major issues, which would help enhance production. Seeing the timely completion of three major railway lines is priority short-term strategy, which would unlock large coal reserves in the states of Jharkhand, Chattisgarh and Odisha for evacuation. Another short-term measure is pursuing MDO (Mine Development Operators) process which would supplement coal production.
Technology nurturingTo increase the production and meet the supply demand, in future, Coal India’s strategies would include productivity improvement in mines through Technology upgradation in opencast mines with induction of high capacity equipment and in underground mines with continuous miner technology in large scale, long wall technology at selected mines, man riding system in major mines and use of telemonitoring techniques. Other system improvements include e-procurement of equipment and spares, e-tender of works and services etc.
Ultimately Coal India’s aim is to meet the targets diligently.

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