The future is nuclear

“When nuclear energy has been successfully applied for power production in, say, a couple of decades from now, India will not have to look abroad for its experts but will find them ready at hand,” wrote Dr Bhabha in a letter to the Dorabji Tata Trust on March 13, 1944. This statement of Dr Bhabha proves his visionary for future of nuclear in India and today it is proving right as the country has huge potential in this sector and is developing on rapid note.
The country expects to have 14.6 GWe nuclear capacity by 2024 and 63GWe by 2032. It also aims to supply 25 per cent of electricity from nuclear power by 2050. To talk more on the development side, at present, India is also determined to get NSG membership that will help the country to attract good investment in the nuclear sector. Continuous effort in this nuclear development can make country to become top destination for the nuclear energy production.
On this note, to augment the nuclear industry this article will describe on why the government should open up atomic energy sector and how safe is nuclear energy.Open up atomic energy sector?India currently operates 21 nuclear power reactors with an installed capacity of 5,780 MW, and the Jaitapur project is crucial to kick-starting its flailing nuclear energy programme. So far, the Indian government has only managed to meet a little over 30 per cent of its target of installing 17,400 MW by 2017. Much of that is due to a lack of interest from foreign reactor makers, who have objected to a law that holds manufacturers liable in case of an accident.
Briefing on why the government should open up atomic energy sector Gaurav Sharma, Sr. Analyst, Independent Power Producers Association of India says, “In September 2015, for instance, General Electric (GE) decided not to invest in the nuclear energy sector in India over uncertainties regarding the liability law. Therefore, it is obvious that this sector will have to be opened up to private participation, by domestic and foreign partners. Unless this is done in a meaningful manner, nuclear power growth in India will remain crippled, this time by self-imposed obstacles.” Since the Prime Minister Narendra Modi has taken extremely bold initiatives in augmenting nuclear capacity addition, serious consideration needs to be given to the transmission system for must-run plants in the 20 year perspective transmission plan. “Amendments to Section 22 of the Atomic Energy Act 1962 may be required to align it with current act and policies in the sector, e.g. the Electricity Act 2003,” he adds.
India’s position outside of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty due to its weapons programme meant that for 34 years until 2009 it was largely excluded from trade in nuclear plant or materials, hampering its development of civil nuclear energy.
“The 2015 edition of BP’s Energy Outlook projected India’s energy production rising by 117 per cent to 2035, outstripped by consumption, which is set to grow by 128 per cent, creating a substantial shortfall,” states Navtej Garewal, SVP –  Regional Operations India, AVEVA Information Technology Pvt Ltd.
This capacity gap, accentuated by India’s shortage of fossil fuels, is driving the investment in nuclear-generated electricity, and the ambition is to achieve a 25 per cent power contribution from nuclear by 2050. In July 2014, Prime Minister Modi urged the Department of Atomic Energy to triple the nuclear capacity to 17 GWe by 2024. He emphasised the importance of maintaining the commercial viability and competitiveness of nuclear energy compared with other clean energy sources. Explaining about the opening up of atomic energy sector Garewal says, “What is clear is that the Indian government is already investing to expand the country’s atomic energy sector, and much of that expansion is based on local skills and labour.”
In fact, the Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd (NPCIL), responsible for design, construction, commissioning and operation of thermal nuclear power plants, said that “India is now focusing on capacity addition through indigenisation” with progressively higher local content for imported designs, (up to 80 per cent).Looking further ahead its augmentation plan includes construction of 25-30 light water reactors of at least 1,000 MWe by 2030. NPCIL is also aiming to involve other public sector and private corporations in future nuclear power expansion, notably National Thermal Power Corporation.“We see these plans as proof of the Indian government’s growing investment commitment to the nuclear power sector, and we are sure in a defined time frame we will be able to see the ground movements soon,” states Garewal.
Looking at the power scenario in India Dennis Manning, Global Business Manager – Nuclear and Semiconductor, 3M Advanced Materials Division believes that the country is using thermal and coal for power generation which is not friendly and rather the country should opt for nuclear. He comments, “For a developing economy like India, power is of utmost importance and we all know the direct correlation between GDP growth and power generated in the country. India still has a large size of population that has no access to electrical power. The current largest source of power in India is thermal and the local coal has high amount of ash content and low calorific value making it very environmentally unfriendly. Taken together, nuclear offers one of the best options for India going forward but the challenges in nuclear power are the high initial investment required and technology.”
He adds, “After Fukushima there has been a growing concern especially on the latter. When you look at the two challenges that the nuclear Industry in India faces they will be best served by opening up of the nuclear power sector to both investment and safe technology available across the globe.”
Opportunity for Indian industryWhile speaking about the opportunities for Indian industry Sharma says, “While nuclear power has good growth potential, a clear and supportive policy framework needs to be put in place to assure the healthy and robust growth of this sector, and to optimise the scope for foreign investment and technology transfer. So far, the nuclear power sector has remained the exclusive responsibility of the government. The government alone would not be able to build up nuclear power on the scale envisaged in the future.”
Critics of the nuclear industry in India point to the slow growth of installed capacity, largely ignoring the extent to which the reactor technologies have been indigenised. But realising projections for future installed capacity, at least by 2050, depend to a significant extent on the deployment of technologies that are still in the conceptual or prototype stages of development.
For the international vendors there are two dimensions along which to make decisions: How should these vendors view the risks associated with exporting reactor technology to India under the current liability framework? Should nuclear commerce be put on hold until a new framework is established or the current one elucidated?
“Today the challenge facing the nuclear power capacity addition program is not just technology development, but its deployment at scale. Rather than developing targets alone, an industry-level roadmap, developed iteratively and jointly through conversations among the public and private stakeholders is needed,” he informs.
With the development in the nuclear sector, the companies are very keen on participating in the nuclear sector and are also waiting to grab significant opportunities.  Informing about the crucial opportunities Garewal says, “We see significant opportunities. AVEVA first entered India in the mid-1990s and has had a direct in-country presence here since 2001. We expanded our activities in India in 2012, as part of a strategic development plan that allowed us to further improve the scope and quality of AVEVA services to the rapidly growing network of customers and partners in India’s oil and gas, power and marine industries.”
He adds, “India is one of our strongest growth areas, both in terms of a rapidly growing customer base and in our heavy investment in R&D facilities here. Investing in the owner operators including nuclear power is an area of prime importance for us and is a definitive way forward as we see it.”
Several of AVEVA global customers have significant involvement in nuclear power, and have a strong local presence in India, and it hope to work with them locally on Indian nuclear power projects.
Manning is very enthusiastic to install and to deploy the technology in India. On this note he says, “The technology being chosen in the latest nuclear power plant builds are both Pressure Water Reactors of the Gen III category. Both reactor designs require the application of enriched boron to operate. The Areva design, EPR, utilises enriched boron in the primary water cooling loop whereas the Westinghouse deign, AP-1000, utilises enriched boron for fuel control. These advanced designs incorporate passive safety features that provide an enhanced level of inherent emergency responses. As a leading supplier of enriched boron into the commercial nuclear power industry, 3M is in a prime position to support this technology deployment in India.”                                
—————The government alone would not be able to build up nuclear power on the scale envisaged in the future.
Gaurav Sharma, Sr. Analyst, Independent Power Producers Association of India—————
——————-The technology being chosen in the latest nuclear power plant builds are both Pressure Water Reactors of the Gen III category.
Dennis Manning, Global Business Manager – Nuclear and Semiconductor, 3M Advanced Materials Division

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The future is nuclear

“When nuclear energy has been successfully applied for power production in, say, a couple of decades from now, India will not have to look abroad for its experts but will find them ready at hand,” wrote Dr Bhabha in a letter to the Dorabji Tata Trust on March 13, 1944. This statement of Dr Bhabha proves his visionary for future of nuclear in India and today it is proving right as the country has huge potential in this sector and is developing on rapid note.
The country expects to have 14.6 GWe nuclear capacity by 2024 and 63GWe by 2032. It also aims to supply 25 per cent of electricity from nuclear power by 2050. To talk more on the development side, at present, India is also determined to get NSG membership that will help the country to attract good investment in the nuclear sector. Continuous effort in this nuclear development can make country to become top destination for the nuclear energy production.
On this note, to augment the nuclear industry this article will describe on why the government should open up atomic energy sector and how safe is nuclear energy.Open up atomic energy sector?India currently operates 21 nuclear power reactors with an installed capacity of 5,780 MW, and the Jaitapur project is crucial to kick-starting its flailing nuclear energy programme. So far, the Indian government has only managed to meet a little over 30 per cent of its target of installing 17,400 MW by 2017. Much of that is due to a lack of interest from foreign reactor makers, who have objected to a law that holds manufacturers liable in case of an accident.
Briefing on why the government should open up atomic energy sector Gaurav Sharma, Sr. Analyst, Independent Power Producers Association of India says, “In September 2015, for instance, General Electric (GE) decided not to invest in the nuclear energy sector in India over uncertainties regarding the liability law. Therefore, it is obvious that this sector will have to be opened up to private participation, by domestic and foreign partners. Unless this is done in a meaningful manner, nuclear power growth in India will remain crippled, this time by self-imposed obstacles.” Since the Prime Minister Narendra Modi has taken extremely bold initiatives in augmenting nuclear capacity addition, serious consideration needs to be given to the transmission system for must-run plants in the 20 year perspective transmission plan. “Amendments to Section 22 of the Atomic Energy Act 1962 may be required to align it with current act and policies in the sector, e.g. the Electricity Act 2003,” he adds.
India’s position outside of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty due to its weapons programme meant that for 34 years until 2009 it was largely excluded from trade in nuclear plant or materials, hampering its development of civil nuclear energy.
“The 2015 edition of BP’s Energy Outlook projected India’s energy production rising by 117 per cent to 2035, outstripped by consumption, which is set to grow by 128 per cent, creating a substantial shortfall,” states Navtej Garewal, SVP –  Regional Operations India, AVEVA Information Technology Pvt Ltd.
This capacity gap, accentuated by India’s shortage of fossil fuels, is driving the investment in nuclear-generated electricity, and the ambition is to achieve a 25 per cent power contribution from nuclear by 2050. In July 2014, Prime Minister Modi urged the Department of Atomic Energy to triple the nuclear capacity to 17 GWe by 2024. He emphasised the importance of maintaining the commercial viability and competitiveness of nuclear energy compared with other clean energy sources. Explaining about the opening up of atomic energy sector Garewal says, “What is clear is that the Indian government is already investing to expand the country’s atomic energy sector, and much of that expansion is based on local skills and labour.”
In fact, the Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd (NPCIL), responsible for design, construction, commissioning and operation of thermal nuclear power plants, said that “India is now focusing on capacity addition through indigenisation” with progressively higher local content for imported designs, (up to 80 per cent).Looking further ahead its augmentation plan includes construction of 25-30 light water reactors of at least 1,000 MWe by 2030. NPCIL is also aiming to involve other public sector and private corporations in future nuclear power expansion, notably National Thermal Power Corporation.“We see these plans as proof of the Indian government’s growing investment commitment to the nuclear power sector, and we are sure in a defined time frame we will be able to see the ground movements soon,” states Garewal.
Looking at the power scenario in India Dennis Manning, Global Business Manager – Nuclear and Semiconductor, 3M Advanced Materials Division believes that the country is using thermal and coal for power generation which is not friendly and rather the country should opt for nuclear. He comments, “For a developing economy like India, power is of utmost importance and we all know the direct correlation between GDP growth and power generated in the country. India still has a large size of population that has no access to electrical power. The current largest source of power in India is thermal and the local coal has high amount of ash content and low calorific value making it very environmentally unfriendly. Taken together, nuclear offers one of the best options for India going forward but the challenges in nuclear power are the high initial investment required and technology.”
He adds, “After Fukushima there has been a growing concern especially on the latter. When you look at the two challenges that the nuclear Industry in India faces they will be best served by opening up of the nuclear power sector to both investment and safe technology available across the globe.”
Opportunity for Indian industryWhile speaking about the opportunities for Indian industry Sharma says, “While nuclear power has good growth potential, a clear and supportive policy framework needs to be put in place to assure the healthy and robust growth of this sector, and to optimise the scope for foreign investment and technology transfer. So far, the nuclear power sector has remained the exclusive responsibility of the government. The government alone would not be able to build up nuclear power on the scale envisaged in the future.”
Critics of the nuclear industry in India point to the slow growth of installed capacity, largely ignoring the extent to which the reactor technologies have been indigenised. But realising projections for future installed capacity, at least by 2050, depend to a significant extent on the deployment of technologies that are still in the conceptual or prototype stages of development.
For the international vendors there are two dimensions along which to make decisions: How should these vendors view the risks associated with exporting reactor technology to India under the current liability framework? Should nuclear commerce be put on hold until a new framework is established or the current one elucidated?
“Today the challenge facing the nuclear power capacity addition program is not just technology development, but its deployment at scale. Rather than developing targets alone, an industry-level roadmap, developed iteratively and jointly through conversations among the public and private stakeholders is needed,” he informs.
With the development in the nuclear sector, the companies are very keen on participating in the nuclear sector and are also waiting to grab significant opportunities.  Informing about the crucial opportunities Garewal says, “We see significant opportunities. AVEVA first entered India in the mid-1990s and has had a direct in-country presence here since 2001. We expanded our activities in India in 2012, as part of a strategic development plan that allowed us to further improve the scope and quality of AVEVA services to the rapidly growing network of customers and partners in India’s oil and gas, power and marine industries.”
He adds, “India is one of our strongest growth areas, both in terms of a rapidly growing customer base and in our heavy investment in R&D facilities here. Investing in the owner operators including nuclear power is an area of prime importance for us and is a definitive way forward as we see it.”
Several of AVEVA global customers have significant involvement in nuclear power, and have a strong local presence in India, and it hope to work with them locally on Indian nuclear power projects.
Manning is very enthusiastic to install and to deploy the technology in India. On this note he says, “The technology being chosen in the latest nuclear power plant builds are both Pressure Water Reactors of the Gen III category. Both reactor designs require the application of enriched boron to operate. The Areva design, EPR, utilises enriched boron in the primary water cooling loop whereas the Westinghouse deign, AP-1000, utilises enriched boron for fuel control. These advanced designs incorporate passive safety features that provide an enhanced level of inherent emergency responses. As a leading supplier of enriched boron into the commercial nuclear power industry, 3M is in a prime position to support this technology deployment in India.”                                
—————The government alone would not be able to build up nuclear power on the scale envisaged in the future.
Gaurav Sharma, Sr. Analyst, Independent Power Producers Association of India—————
——————-The technology being chosen in the latest nuclear power plant builds are both Pressure Water Reactors of the Gen III category.
Dennis Manning, Global Business Manager – Nuclear and Semiconductor, 3M Advanced Materials Division

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